ERASMUS+ PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION

Last updated on October 12th, 2017

    Last updated on October 12th, 2017

  1. ERASMUS PROGRAMME

    WHAT IS THE ERASMUS PROGRAMME?

    The Erasmus programme is an education programme of the EU for promoting multilateral cooperation between the higher education institutions in Europe. It provides a complimentary financial support –as grant- for higher education institutions to create and realize their mutual projects, exchange students, administrative and academic personnel. This programme was named after the Dutch scientist Erasmus (1469-1536) who was one of the important representatives of the Renaissance Humanism, because of the fact that he stayed in different European countries both as a student and academician.

    WHAT IS NOT THE ERASMUS PROGRAMME?

    • The Erasmus Programme is not a “foreign language learning programme”.
    • The Erasmus Programme is not exactly a “scholarship” programme.
    • The Erasmus Programme is not a “diploma” programme.
    • The Erasmus Programme is not a “research” programme.

    ERASMUS: ADVANTAGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

    • Flexibility: Taking into account the importance of flexibility in today’s world, the advantage of the programme enabling flexibility in educational life can be understood clearly: to prepare students for their professional lives. The best preparation for the modern professional life, which requires adaptation to new conditions constantly, is to experience adaptation to new conditions also in educational life.
    • Adaptability: The development of adaptability has also an important role in the preparation for professional life. The key determinants of success in today’s professional life include competences as working in a foreign country, adapting to its culture and advanced knowledge of foreign language. Even if you are sure that you will do the same work after graduation for a long time, Erasmus is offering you a priceless opportunity in developing your social adaptability because of the fact that you will have to enter into a dialogue with foreign cultures within the scope of this work, too.
    • Maturity: Living and working in another country, being engaged in its administrative process and bureaucracy, meeting the European bureaucracy by filling tens of forms and completing all these procedures successfully will enhance your self-confidence. In addition, the experiences you gained will contribute to your maturity in an important way.
    • Career: After you met the term flexibility in higher education, developed your adaptability and reached the required maturity level, the advantages you will have in the entrance to professional life are clear. The new lines you will add into your CV by gaining experiences abroad will enrich the studies in the countries participating in the programme and your professional life with new pages after graduation and the mutual exchange of educators in Europe!

    AIM OF THE PROGRAMME

    The aim of the programme is to improve the quality of higher education in Europe and strengthen the dimension of it. This aim can be summarized as offering good practices in Europe’s different countries for the benefit of the whole. The Erasmus programme is trying to fulfill the stated aims by promoting intercountry cooperation between universities, recognizing students’ degrees academically and contributing to the development of transparency.

  2. ECTS

    ECTS Users’ Guide

    Bologna Process Implementation Report


    European Credit Transfer System (ECTS)

    ECTS(European Credit Transfer System) is an academic equivalance system which is supported by Erasmus Programme, and its objective is to provide that the grades of excahnge students studying at different countries’ educational institutions are mutually and fairly acknowledged by the related institutions. The long term objective of this system is to provide a european-wide standardization in grade and credit matters. Therefore it empowers the educational part of the European integration.

    In this regard European Credit Transfer System is qualified as a “common language” in the field of higher education in Europe. When academicians apply ECTS to their courses they have to inspect the course content because according to ECTS principles while applying new credit system they are obliged to take student’s studying hours, complexity of the course, learning targets and the occupational contribution of the course to the student into consideration. This obligation results in renewal of the course intent and higher education quality.

    How to apply ECTS?

    The basic tools below are used applying ECTS.

    Training Manual(ECTS Information Package): This information package is prepared collectively by related people both from central level and faculty and departments , it includes every academic and social information that an exchange student would need. Therefore it should also include detailed information about ECTS and how to aplly it. Besides deparments which join student exchange programme should add information to this manual, about how a course is teached, ECTS credits of that course, course content and other necessary information, for each course.

    Application Form: Application form is filled by the student who is willing to join the exchange programme and it gives information about students’ academic and social competence.

    Learning Agreement: Learning Agreement is a triple alliance between the student, his/her institution and the institution which the student would get education. Learning Agreement provides equivalance of the courses that the student have to take abroad and courses back at his/her own institution.

    ECTS Transcript: ECTS Transcript shows  an exchange student’s success both before going abroad and after turning back. The courses’ credits which are taken abroad are identified both as local grades and ECTS’s standard system and are shown on this transcript.

    ECTS Grading System

    European Credit Transfer System is divided into two basic fields in practice:

    ECTS Credit: This topic is the most important subject for ECTS. According to this the basic rule for the intutions which would join ECTS is the total credits of all courses in a year must be 60.  In this condition each semester the number of the obligatory credits would be 30. At this point we see that another important issue is that the criterion in determining the credit amount is “work load”. The work load of a course is determined by looking at: weekly course hours, seminars, practice implementation, fieldworks, research projects, thesis, individual studying at home or in a library.

    All of these criterions are used in determining the credit amount of any course, therefore, for instance when a course’s weekly hours are low but it requires lots of individual studying, then its credit could be higher than another course which have more weekly hours. In other words the important point is to being fair as much as possible while determining the credit amounts.

    ECTS Grading System: The most common difficulty in applying exchange programme in higher education field is that students’ success are evaluated in a different way by different countries’ educational institutions. Consequently students are sometimes aggrieved when they come back home. In order to overcome this problem a system is created, aiming transparency in grading. According to that it is agreed on the numbers on the chart below.

    The grading system on the chart below is not explaining an intervention to the grading systems of educational institutions. Higher education institutions decide on how to apply ECTS grading system on their own.

    Chart 5 : ECTS Grading System

     

    ECTS Grade

     

    Estimated Grade of the Student

     

    Definition

                  A                10 Excellent
                  B                25 Very Good
                  C                30 Good
                  D                25 Satisfactory
                  E                10 Sufficent
                  FX Fail
                  F Fail

    Other than this basic grading system, the national grading systems of European countries are as in the chart below:

    Chart 6: National Grading System of European Countries

    Country
    Germany 5 4 3 2 1
    Austria 5 4 3 2 1
    Belgium 0-9 10 11-13 14-16 17-18 19-20
    Denmark 0-5 6 7 8,9 10,11 12,13
    Finland 1 1 ½ 2 2, 2½ 3
    France 7-9 10 12 14 16
    Greace 1-4 5 6 7 8,9 10
    England fail Third pass Lower 2nd Upper
    2nd
    1
    Italy 1-5 18-24 25,26 27-29 30 30 lode
    Ireland fail pass 3rd 2nd / II 2nd /I I
    Netherlands 1-5 6 6 ½,7 7½,8 9,10
    Norway 4,01-6,0 3,26-4,0 5,51-3,25 1,51-2,5 1,0-1,5
    Porteguese 1-9 10,11 12,13 14,16 17,18 19,20
    Spain** 0-5 5-7 7-9 9-10
    Sweden underkänt godkänt godkänt välgodkänt velgodkänt
    Switzerland 4- 4 5 6
    Approximate equivalance
    ECTS Grade F
    Fail
    E
    Sufficent
    D
    Satisfactory
    C
    Good
    B
    Very good
    A
    Excellent
    Range* 10% 25% 30% 25% 10%

    *Percentage of the successful students.

    **Percentages for Spanish are different.
    There are few problems about implanting and being interpreted of ECTS. The facts that there are no credit systems in many European countries and that  they get to know credit system owing to ECTS, that there are differences between higher education systems, grading and evaluation systems are posing an obstacle to adopt and implement ECTS. However in accordance with the agreed objectives until 2012 in Bologna Declaration; proliferation of the implementation of ECTS, reducing the bachelor period from 4 to 3 years, Diploma Supplement which allows degrees’ recognition, harmonizing the educational systems are crucial studies in order to popularize ECTS.

INCOMING STUDENTS IN SCOPE OF ERASMUS PROGRAMME (BETWEEN 2004-2017)
COUNTRIES 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012 – 2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
GERMANY 5 7 6 9 15 15 13 26 36 47 54 55 40
AUSTRIA 1 1 1 1
BELGIUM 2 6 10 6 9 7 1 7 8 4 2
BULGARIA 2 2 1 1 3 1
CZECH REP. 5 2 6 5 3 7 11 4 4
DENMARK 1 1 1 6 5 2
FINLAND 1 1 2 1 2 2 3 1
FRANCE 2 4 2 7 4 7 9 16 19 21 15 3
NETHERLANDS 5 6 16 11 10 6 14 7 10 17 9 11 14
ENGLAND 1
IRELAND 2 1
SWEDEN 2 2
SWITZERLAND 1
SPAIN 5 1 3 3 3 3 7 2
ITALY 1 3 2 3 3 8 14 12 9
LATVIA 1 2
LITHUANIA 2 3 1 4 3 2 6 4 3
HUNGARY 4 2 5 2 4 2
POLAND 2 2 2 7 6 18 18 14 7 9
PORTUGUESE 2 2 5 4 2 10 1
POMANIA 2 2 1 1 11 3
SLOVAK REP. 1 1 1 1
SLOVENIA 1 2 3 1 3 7 8 2
GREECE 1 2 2 1
OTHER 7 4 1 1 7 2
TOTAL 13 23 32 45 62 62 74 93 116 145 158 131 69
OUTGOING STUDENTS IN SCOPE OF ERASMUS STUDY MOBILITY (BETWEEN 2004-2017)
COUNTRIES 2004
2005
2005
2006
2006
2007
2007
2008
2008
2009
2009
2010
2010
2011
2011
2012
2012
2013
2013
2014
2014
2015
2015 2016 2016 2017
GERMANY 17 31 27 37 18 31 36 48 90 42 59 69 78
AUSTRIA 9 2 8 4 8 8 5 10 10 2 4 6
BELGIUM 1 4 5 10 5 9 18 20 19 21 7 7
BULGARIA 1 1 3 1
CZECH REP. 2 1 6 5 6 13 32 7 17 11
DENMARK 2 2 2 1 9 4 4 3 1
FINLAND 5 6 6 10 9 10 8 8 4 2 6
FRANCE 2 2 4 8 10 4 12 18 16 4 6 5
NETHERLANDS 15 20 18 18 14 12 17 13 16 13 6 13 1
ENGLAND 1 1 3 4 1 3 6 1 1 8
IRELAND 2 3 1
SWEDEN 3 1 1
SWITZERLAND 1
SPAIN 2 3 2 4 2 5 7 17 8 8 5
ITALY 1 2 3 5 19 17 35 40 14 17
LATVIA 1 3 5 1 1 1
LITHUANIA 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 5 4 1 4
HUNGARY 1 8 9 5 10 12 16 14 11 14
POLAND 3 4 6 8 8 24 29 32 18 44 45
PORTUGAL 2 2 5 4 2 10 9 10 3 2 4
ROMANIA 1 2 3 3 5 17 4 11 12
SLOVAK REP. 1 1 2 1 1 2 1
SLOVENIA 1 4 5 7 14 11 5 14 12
GREECE 3 2 3 2 2 2 1 2 4 2
TOTAL 36 69 75 104 91 135 159 203 301 312 161 238 231
THE DISTRIBUTION OF DEU STUDENTS WHO PARTICIPATED IN ERASMUS+ TRAINEESHIP MOBILTY ON THE BASIS OF THE COUNTRIES WHERE THEY DID THEIR TRAINING (BETWEEN 2009-2017 )
COUNTRIES 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015 2016 2016 2017
GERMANY 4 2 3 7 8 7 7 8
AUSTRIA 1 2 2 3 1
BELGIUM 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1
BULGARIA 1
CZECH REPUBLIC 2 1
DANMARK 1 2
ESTONIA 1
FINLAND 1
FRANCE 2 1 1
HOLLAND 1 1 1 1 2 1
ENGLAND 1 2 2 8 3 3 2
IRELAND 2
SWEDEN 1 1
SWITZERLAND
SPAIN 3 3 4 5
ITALY 2 2 3 3 1 4
LATVIA 1
LITHUANIA
MALTA 1
HUNGARY 1 1 2
NORWAY 1
POLAND 1 1 2 1 2
PORTUGAL 1 1 2 6
ROMANIA 1
SLOVAKIA 2
SLOVENIA 1
GREECE 1 1
TOTAL 9 5 7 25 31 35 21 39

OUTGOING ACADEMICIAN IN SCOPE OF ERASMUS PROGRAMME (BETWEEN 2004-2016)

COUNTRIES 2004

2005

2005

2006

2006

2007

2007

2008

2008

2009

2009

2010

2010

2011

2011

2012

2012

2013

2013

2014

2014

2015

2015

2016

GERMANY 14 8 5 11 5 9 6 3 9 8 3 6
AUSTRIA 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 3
BELGIUM 2 2 2 4 6 5 2 2 4 1 1
BULGARIA 1
CZECH REP. 1 2 3 4 3 1
DENMARK 1 1 2 1 2
FINLAND 2 1 3 3 2 2 4 2 1
FRANCE 1 2 2 1 2 5 1 1
NETHERLANDS 2 5 4 4 4 3 1 1 4 1
ENGLAND 1 1
IRELAND 1
SWEDEN 2 1 1 1
SWITZERLAND
SPAIN 1 2 1 3 1
ITALY 1 1 3 2 2 1 2 6 3 3 2
LATVIA 1 1 1
LITHUANIA 2 2 1 1 1 2 1
HUNGARY 5 1 1 1 4 4 1 1
MALTA 1
POLAND 1 2 1 4 3 5 3 1 3
PORTUGUESE 5 1 1 1
ROMANIA 1 1 1 2
SLOVAK REP. 1 1
SLOVENIA 1 1 1 1
GREECE 2 3 1 1 1 5 3 1 1
OTHER
TOTAL 23 26 23 49 31 32 24 36 38 41 12
ACADEMIC YEAR OUTGOING STUDETNS INCOMING STUDETNS OUTGOING STAFF INCOMING STAFF
2003-2004 7
2004-2005 36 13 22
2005-2006 69 23 26
2006-2007 75 32 40
2007-2008 104 45 53 18
2008-2009 91 62 30 41
2009-2010 135 62 28 24
2010-2011 159 74 24 37
2011-2012 203 93 37 40
2012-2013 301 116 44 54
2013-2014 407 145 52 57
2014-2015 161 158 16 35
2015-2016  238 131  18 33
2016-2017 270 69 19 19
TOTAL 2018 1.023 391 358